Road Trip

Homemade Road Trip Snacks
Jun11

There’s nothing quite as satisfying as settling in for a summer road trip surrounded by your favourite treats. It’s easy to stock up on chips, candy, and pop but why not try a healthier route this year? These homemade road trip snacks are a better alternative to prepackaged junk. 

What are we looking for in homemade road trip snack ideas? 

Sure, anything can technically be a road trip snack so long as it doesn’t take up too much room. But we are specifically looking for road trip snacks that:

  • are easily portable 
  • don’t create much waste
  • non-messy and doesn’t leak  
  • don’t spoil quickly
  • no utensils needed 
  • Healthy (ish)! 

With saying that, let’s dive in! 

DIY Trail Mix 

This is one of the easiest and most filling options for a DIY road trip snack. Go to the bulk section at your grocery store and pick from their selection of nuts, pretzels, crackers, dried fruit, cereal, chocolate, candy, or anything else you want to add. You can make this snack as healthy as you want by adding more nuts and fruit and fewer sweets. You can also make each road trip guest’s baggy a bit different. If Jen loves M&Ms, add some extras to hers. If Bill hates pretzels, leave them out for him. Be sure to use reusable Tupperware or lunch baggies to keep this treat eco-friendly. 

Dehydrated Fruit Pieces 

You can buy these pre-made or make them yourself. We’re a fan of homemade dehydrated fruit because you can use fresh, local produce and make more for your buck. Apples, strawberries, bananas, apricots, and cherries are all popular fruits for dehydrating. You can dehydrate your fruit with a variety of tools: specialty dehydrator appliances, an air fryer, or even your oven. You can even go all out and make dehydrated fruit leather snacks

Baked Kale or Potato Skin Chips

Potato chips and other salty fried snacks are a popular road trip treat. However, they are often over-salted and packed with bad fats. Making your own chips using kale or potato skins is a healthy alternative. Whichever you decide to use, kale or potato skins, making chips is as easy as coating them lightly in oil, adding a pinch of seasoning (salt or your choice), and popping them in the oven for a bit. Remember: these snacks might be brittle once prepared so packing them in a bag is ill-advised. Try a sturdy Tupperware container instead! A piece of paper towel at the bottom will soak up excess oil until you’re ready to eat them. 

Fun Flavoured Popcorn

Popcorn is a super easy pack-and-go snack but you can make it even better by experimenting with different flavours. Try Salty Spicy Popcorn, Cinnamon Honey Popcorn, or Cheddar Cheese Popcorn. Google search “popcorn + [your favourite flavour profile]” and something will probably pop up. If not, invent it yourself! If you aren’t feeling particularly crafty you can also buy flavour shakers for your popcorn. This works particularly well if your road trip crew can’t decide on one flavour—get a few of each! 

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Need help planning your BC road trip? Contact us at Breakaway Vacations and we’ll help you plan something perfect! 

Food for Travelling
Feb26

What is a road trip without a cooler full of snacks for the drive? And why settle for dry cookies and soda if you’re travelling by plane? There must be a better way! Follow this guide to become the master of the Travel Snack. In this article, we’ll cover non-perishable travel food, food to eat while travelling in a car, and meals that travel well. Everything you need to know to stay nourished in motion.   

What is the best food for travelling?  

The best food for travelling will be something compact, something that can last without refrigeration, and something that won’t leak or spill. However, you’ll also want something healthy. Part of the challenge of eating on a trip is finding healthy food items that travel well. After all, you could just pack potato chips and candy…but you’d probably feel pretty sick a few hours in.   

How do you pack food for travel?  

Try to use reusable containers, where possible. Plastic or glass Tupperware with well-sealing lids are best. If you need to wrap something, consider using “beeswax” wrap as a more sustainable option than plastic. If you have room in your vehicle, consider packing a cooler with a few ice packs to keep everything fresh. This will also lessen the likelihood of the food being damaged by a sudden turn or brake.   

What can you NOT eat on a road trip?   

You’ll want to avoid any food that sloshes, sticks, or otherwise makes a mess. Also, food that might get damaged by the journey is a no-go. Food to eat while travelling in a car needs to be sturdy, well packaged, and hearty. Some people made ahead meals for travelling…and sometimes this works! Often, though, you’re plagued by big messes and cold leftovers. Stick to something simple, like sandwiches!  

What should you eat on a flight?  

Depending on the length of the flight, you might not need to eat at all. Or you might be served an in-flight meal. However, if you feel like you will need food with you, consider options that will make it through security (no liquid) and won’t bother the other passengers with strong scents. Focus on non-perishable travel food if you are packing for longer than a day’s trip.   

A sample road trip grocery list might include:  

  • Trail mix, dried fruit (apricot, banana)
  • Granola bars, pretzels
  • Fruit that doesn’t crush or bruise easily (apples, plums, mandarin oranges)
  • Breakfast shake or smoothie
  • Snacking vegetables (sliced carrots, sugar snap peas).  

Sample food to pack when traveling abroad:  

  • Anything from the above road trip grocery list
  • Dried oatmeal packets for quick meals
  • Wrapped sandwiches for the plane (nothing smelly, no eggs!)
  • Homemade baked goods that remind you of home 

It’s never too early to start planning your next trip. Think Breakaway Vacations for a luxury vacation experience right here in British Columbia.   

road trip checklist graphics
Jan15

Does your vehicle pass the road trip checklist? Keep reading to find out.

Road trips are a great alternative to traditional plane, train, or bus-based travel right now. If you want to avoid packed airports, and the germ-spreading potential of recycled plane air, driving yourself to your vacation destination is the way to go. It also ensures that you are only traveling with your “close-knit” crew, be it friends or family, and not exposing yourself outside of your social bubble.   

Before you through a weekend bag in your trunk and pick a travel playlist, we recommend doing a once-over inspection of your vehicle of choice. Here are 7 things you should always check on your car before setting out on the wide, open highway.  

1. Fluid Check & Oil Change   

If it’s been a while since your last oil change, you should get one done (or do it yourself) before any long trip. You should change your oil approximately every six months (depending on M/KM usage). While you are at it, check the status of your transmission fluid, brake fluid, power steering fluid, and coolant, as well.  

2. Battery Voltage   

If you have your own test equipment, you can do this at home. Otherwise, take your vehicle to a trusted service provider and ask them to test the battery voltage. If the reading is too low, or it’s been over three years, you might consider a battery replacement. If your battery needs a charge, it can take anywhere from 4 to 24 hours to do so. So, leave enough time in your schedule to handle this before you go. Battery problems are one of the top reasons AAA listed for emergency intervention on the road, so make sure you are ready.  

3. Brake Check  

Typically, the brake warning light on the car console will come on if there is an issue; however, it’s always good to do a quick self-lead check. If you already did the fluid check (above) then you’re ahead of the game. When testing your brakes: listen for any abnormal noises (squealing, scarping), note if the vehicle is erroneously pulling to one side or the other, and make note of the pedal feel as you press it. If anything seems out of whack, take it to a shop to get checked.   

4. Turn Signal Lights & Headlights   

For this, you’ll need a partner. Have someone stand outside your vehicle as you flash each turn signal (have them check back and front lights), brake lights, headlights, and fog lights. Remember that a burned-out bulb can get you a very easy-to-avoid ticket! Be sure to change any light bulbs that are performing poorly.   

5. Tire Air Pressure (Including Spare)  

Tire trouble is not only very common on long trips, but it is so, so easily avoidable. Check the tire pressure before you leave and keep a portable tire pressure gauge in your vehicle for on-the-go inspections. Fill your tires with air according to the levels recommended in the vehicle’s manual. If you have a spare tire: fill that one up, too! After all, it won’t do you any good to lug around a spare tire if it’s flat.   

6. Insurance Paperwork, Registration, and License   

Sometimes the most obvious things get forgotten about. Do a quick check to ensure that the insurance paperwork is kept somewhere obvious and accessible. Check the expiration date on your license. And make sure your plates aren’t due to expire any time soon.   

7. First Aid Kit & Emergency Items   

This is one of the most important parts of any road trip checklist. Be sure to have a roadside assistance emergency kit in your vehicle at all times, particularly when you are about to embark on a long road trip. You can also cobble one together yourself. You’ll want to include bandages, alcohol pads, a flashlight, candles, matches, jumper cables, reflective devices, and maybe even an emergency blanket.

Planning a road trip this year? Check out Breakaway Vacations’ various rental properties in the Okanagan and Vancouver Island areas. Booking now for summer 2021.